HIGH SCHOOL

 » Department Head

Mr. Bajrami

 » Department Staff

Ms. Soto

» Department’s Philosophy

Arts programs at every level strive to impart the fundamental skills necessary for students to solve problems, think critically, engage each other creatively, and feel a sense of accomplishment as individuals and as part of a community. Students develop technical skills and engage with technologies that range from the traditional, to the modern and contemporary. Course offerings increase in sophistication and specificity to include more formal and focused work in photography and digital media, sculpture and ceramics, and drawing and painting. Through instruction and discussion, students are challenged to sharpen their critical, analytical, and perceptual skills. They are also encouraged to develop standards for appreciating and evaluating both the world immediately around them and the aesthetic achievements of the past and present.

» Standards

The visual art department follows the NJ state standards. The NJ visual art standards can be found here.

» Course List with a short description of each course and course pre-requisite if any

Drawing and Painting:

Drawing and painting are basic forms of visual communication and integral skills for artistic expression. This course challenges students to explore styles of drawing and painting throughout art history. Students will be introduced to several 2D media and advanced techniques including: graphite, charcoal, watercolor, acrylic, and oil paint. Emphasis will be placed on developing skills necessary for free-hand sketching, rendering, and creative expression. Students will develop skills to creatively solve design problems while communicating personal expressions in each artwork they create. A working sketchbook will be an important part of this course. Students will be asked to maintain and submit their sketchbooks on a regular basis.

Digital Media:

Digital imagery and graphic software programs create most of the images we see today. The job market is in need of individuals who know how to use technology and artistic talent to creatively solve design problems. In this course students’ art skills are enhanced through the use of the computer, digital camera, scanner and computer software to create personally expressive original artworks. Units of study include elements & principles of art and design, digital photography, graphic design and illustration. Emphasis will be placed on developing skills necessary for digital photography, non-destructive editing, Adobe PhotoShop, and Adobe Illustrator. Students will gain the most from this course if they have access to a DSLR camera, Adobe PhotoShop, and Adobe Illustrator outside of class. A working sketchbook will be an important part of this course. Students will be asked to maintain and submit their sketchbooks on a regular basis.

Sculpture and Ceramics:

This course will focus on the use of clay as a primary material, along with other mixed media, to create three-dimensional sculptures. Units of study include, but are not limited to: functional & non-functional clay pottery, representational & nonrepresentational sculpture, pinch, coil, slab and wheel thrown construction techniques. A working sketchbook will be an important part of this course. Students will be asked to maintain and submit their sketchbooks on a regular basis.

» Tutoring Location

Art Room

» Other useful information about the department

As sketching and idea building is an integral part of the advanced art making process, high school level art students will be required to provide their own sketchbooks.

Department Head
Dr. Yildiz

Department Staff
Mr. Amal Fouad

Department’s Philosophy

All students should be proficient in the use of 21st Century technologies.  They will feel comfortable using new digital devices and software, and be confident that they can use the information literacy skills to assess the validity of digital information.

Standards (provide the standards used or link where we can obtain them)

NJ Core Curricular standards are found at:

www.state.nj.us/education/cccs/standards/8/8.pdf‎

The IT Department will fulfill the New Jersey Core Curriculum Standards by using technology in conjunction with relevant subject areas.

Course List with a short description of each course and course pre-requisite if any

Web Design

This course teaches students to create their own websites and to update content.  It includes the planning process and the inclusion of media and scripts.

JAVA

Students will learn the fundamentals of JAVA and create JAVA programs of their own.

Tutoring Hours for each staff member 

Samet Deniz – after school on non-club days

Tutoring Location 

Computer Lab

» Department Head

Ms. Lee

» Department Staff

Lauren Hughes, Caitlin Nielsen

» Department Philosophy

The English Department strives to create a rigorous and academically challenging curriculum. The Department aims to foster creativity in students who read closely, write precisely, collaborate effectively, reflect purposefully, and solve problems ethically. To that end, students will be exposed to various literary works that will expand their views of the world. It is our hope that students will look at the world with a 360 degree lens. The English faculty is committed to developing communication skills in students that will enable them to be successful in college and beyond.  We want students to develop their own unique voices and to understand the importance of literature and language in their everyday lives and find personal connections to the texts that enhance their understanding of themselves and the world.

In our English classes, the English Department and our students are called upon to think and ask why? Through our exploration of literature and the development of our voices through our oral and written works, we aspire to make the world a better place. We will read short stories, novels, plays, fiction, and non-fiction. We will hone our grammar and writing skills through various writing assignments including narratives and essays.  We will share our thoughts and ideas with our classmates while sharpening our speaking skills through speeches and presentations.

» Standards

http://www.corestandards.org/ela-literacy

Course List with a short description of each course and course pre-requisite if any

» Goals

The Language Arts Department has an integrated program that stresses various forms of classic and contemporary literature. There is emphasis on basic skills, study skills, English grammar (usage and mechanics), vocabulary, spelling, literary concepts, note taking, writing techniques and styles (penmanship), research skills, reading strategies & comprehension, and speaking & listening skills.

» Course Learning Objectives

  • Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • Determine a theme or central idea of a text and how it is conveyed through particular details; provide a summary of the text distinct from personal opinions or judgements.
  • Describe how a particular text’s plot unfolds in a series of episodes as well as how the characters respond or change as the plot moves toward a resolution.
  • Determine a central idea of a text and how it is conveyed through particular details; provide a summary of the text distinct from personal opinions or judgements.
  • Analyze in detail how a key individual, event, or idea is introduced, illustrated and elaborated in a text (e.g., through examples or anecdotes).
  • Compose a five paragraph persuasive essay, with a well-developed central argument, and topic sentences in each paragraph which include references to literature as supporting details.
  • Compose a narrative essay which develops real or imagined circumstances using effective techniques, relevant descriptive details, and well-structured event sequences.

» English I: Introduction to Literature CP and Honors

English I is a course designed for the expansion of reading, writing, and speaking and listening skills. Formal lessons are designed to increase the students’ working vocabulary, both oral and written, as a life skill. A broad range of language skills will be stressed. An emphasis will be placed on mechanics and style in an effort to enable students to write in a clear expository style.

» Course Learning Objectives

  • Compose short essays containing an introduction, body and conclusion
  • Develop vocabulary through a systematic program of study
  • Read books on his/her independent reading level
  • Employ test-taking strategies to improve scores on standardized tests
  • Make proper use of print and non-print sources, including online
  • Read and discuss assigned works of fiction and nonfiction
  • Write structured reactions to the studied works
  • Prepare and present brief oral reports and speeches
  • Engage in structured listening, speaking, and viewing activities
  • Maintain an informal journal related to class readings and personal experience
  • Ascertain topics and main ideas in various readings
  • Employ an organized, systematic method for taking notes
  • Explore career opportunities
  • Collaborate by sharing ideas, examples and insights productively and respectfully in informal discussion/conversation
  • Utilize appropriate multi-media technology to present an oral project.

» English II: World Literature CP and Honors

English II or World Literature undertakes to send students on a literary journey of reading and writing through a variety of texts taken from non-English speaking origins. Students will read and analyze a diverse set of literary and nonfiction texts by comparing and contrasting the techniques authors use in literature of varying cultures and eras. Students will grasp a thorough understanding of grammar, punctuation, spelling, and paragraph structure throughout the course. There will be a heavy emphasis on using clear, concise writing through writing as a process in expository and analytic frameworks. With an emphasis on expository and analytical writing, students will expand their understanding of writing as a process and develop their skills in revising to address a specific audience and purpose. Students will complete vocabulary assessments in anticipation of preparing for the SAT/ACT. In addition to shorter papers, students will draft one research paper and will have a full working knowledge of the research process including citations and use of MLA format. Collaborative learning will be stressed throughout the duration of the course.

» Course Learning Objectives

  • Develop vocabulary through a systematic program of study
  • Read books on his/her independent reading level
  • Employ test-taking strategies to improve scores on standardized tests (SAT/ACT)
  • Make proper use of print and non-print sources, including online
  • Read and discuss assigned works of fiction and nonfiction
  • Write structured reactions to the studied works
  • Prepare and present brief oral reports and speeches
  • Engage in structured listening, speaking, and viewing activities
  • Ascertain topics and main ideas in various readings
  • Employ an organized, systematic method for taking notes
  • Collaborate by sharing ideas, examples and insights productively and respectfully in informal discussion/conversation
  • Utilize appropriate multi-media technology to present an oral project.
  • Compose a research paper using MLA format

» English III: American Literature

English III is the study of the form, content, and analysis of literary genres is continued through a chronological study of the writings of American authors finally concentrating on modern American writers. Cultural changes in the United States are observed through writings, which reflect the various philosophies of a growing and expanding country. Students in the honors section of American Literature engage in a more expanded study of each author than the study in the regular sections. They are expected to produce essays with an emphasis on analysis and divergent thinking culminating in the writing of a research paper.

Course Learning Objectives:

  • Read and analyze literary selections representative of diverse cultural backgrounds
  • Trace the development of drama, poetry, nonfiction and fiction
  • Define and offer examples of a variety of literary terms and techniques found in literature
  • Read in-depth selections considered the master works of major writers
  • Identify universal themes in literature
  • Compare and contrast the treatments of similar themes in different works and time periods
  • Relate ideas presented in all literary works studied to present day situations
  • Explore the arts as a reflection of enduring values and essential human nature
  • Practice critical reading skills with emphasis on understanding an author’s style and tone
  • Identify and explain the motivations of characters
  • Discuss and analyze the criteria which determine why certain works have survived over time
  • Evaluate the literary works studied as reflections of the society producing them
  • Prepare written and oral presentations using research skills
  • Write in a variety of styles: expository, narrative and persuasive
  • Develop and review vocabulary in preparation for the Scholastic Aptitude Test
  • Develop strategies for responding to comprehension, vocabulary and writing on the SATs
  • Integrate the disciplines of music, art, literature, history and philosophy
  • Incorporate multi-media projects into one or more of the units of study

» Course Texts

Glencoe-McGraw Hill American Literature

Sadlier Oxford Vocabulary Level F

The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain

To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee

The Awakening (selections) by Kate Chopin

The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald

» English IV: British Literature

This course introduces students to the major authors, literature, and thoughts of British literature. Students will consider how British literature has affected and been affected by the world. Identifying and examining the central themes and ideas of British literature is at the core of the course. Students will critically read, examine, interpret, and discuss a variety of British literature from several eras using different lenses from aesthetic to analytical. Students will perfect their writing by composing analytical essays, creative works, and in-class writing assignments.

» Course Learning Objectives

  • Read and analyze literary selections representative of diverse cultural backgrounds
  • Trace the development of drama, poetry, nonfiction and fiction
  • Define and offer examples of a variety of literary terms and techniques found in literature
  • Read in-depth selections considered the master works of major writers
  • Identify universal themes in literature
  • Compare and contrast the treatments of similar themes in different works and time periods
  • Relate ideas presented in all literary works studied to present day situations
  • Explore the arts as a reflection of enduring values and essential human nature
  • Practice critical reading skills with emphasis on understanding an author’s style and tone
  • Identify and explain the motivations of characters
  • Discuss and analyze the criteria which determine why certain works have survived over time
  • Evaluate the literary works studied as reflections of the society producing them
  • Prepare written and oral presentations using research skills
  • Write in a variety of styles: expository, narrative and persuasive
  • Develop and review vocabulary in preparation for the Scholastic Aptitude Test
  • Develop strategies for responding to comprehension, vocabulary and writing on the SATs
  • Integrate the disciplines of music, art, literature, history and philosophy
  • Incorporate multi-media projects into one or more of the units of study

» AP Language and Composition

The AP English Language and Composition course is designed to mold students into skilled readers of prose written in a variety of rhetorical modes who can proficiently compose in a variety of contexts. Both their writing and their reading should make students aware of the interactions among a writer’s purposes, audience expectations, and subjects as well as the way generic conventions and the resources of language contribute to effective writing. We will discuss how to read primary and secondary sources carefully, to synthesize materials from these texts into one’s own writing, and to cite sources using conventions recommended by the Modern Language Association (MLA). Students will absorb and analyze material from primarily non fiction pieces, as the majority of the AP exam asks students to examine nonfiction works. Students will review and practice all essay types including rhetorical analysis, argumentative, and synthesis as well as practice multiple choice questions through periodic quizzes. The goal of the course is to push students toward receiving a “5” on the AP examination administered by College Board. The course will both introduce students to a variety of texts as well as spend ample time preparing for the AP examination.

» Course Learning Objectives

Students are evaluated on the basis of major papers, homework, quality and character of class participation and involvement, and AP-style writing prompts. Major papers are a significant portion of each quarter’s grade. Students earn both numbered scores and grades on AP prompts they take during the year. The grade associated with particular AP essay scores varies according to the time of year that is, a very good essay written in November earns a higher grade than a similar essay written in April. That’s because students are at work building the skills needed to succeed as the year proceeds. Student performance in connection with important course components contributes to each student’s final grade for the course in the following manner:

In this course, student thinking, writing, reading, listening, and speaking are at the center of class activity. Grading is viewed in this context. Teachers continually assess student performance and progress, as evidenced by papers, in-class task commitment, homework, and daily preparation. Course products are regularly reviewed. One goal of our evaluation is to enable students to become more comfortable with self-assessment.

The usual A–B–C–D–F system is used to grade student work each quarter. Teachers discuss grades with students in conferences during the marking periods. In addition to the usual grades, an unsatisfactory finished piece of writing may, at the teacher’s discretion, receive a grade of R, indicating that it may be revised or reworked, then resubmitted for a grade, without penalty. Teachers regularly observe and assess student knowledge and ability. They collect and assess student products, such as finished written pieces, on-demand writing, homework, tests and quizzes, response journals, and class notes.

» Texts

The Language of Composition: Reading, Writing, Rhetoric by Renee H. Shea, Lawrence Scanlon, Robin Dissin Aufses

A Tale of Two Cities  by Charles Dickens (selections)

The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson (selections)

The Art of the Personal Essay: An Anthology from the Classical Era to the Present by Phillip Lopate:

Consolation to His Wife by Plutarch, Of Books by Michel de Montaigne and others

Sadlier Oxford Vocabulary Level F & AP Language-ready vocabulary lists

The Bedford Handbook. Hacker, Diana. Boston: Bedford/St. Martin’s.

The Elements of Style (Selections) by William Strunk, Jr.

Walden by Henry David Thoreau

Various political speeches

Department Head

Dr. Davut Yildiz

Staff

Bilal Camlibel, Brian Caiazzo

Philosophy

We believe in creating learning environments where students practice and acquire the knowledge of mathematics. We believe that students should be able to Proficiently apply a range of numerical, algebraic, geometric, and statistical

Concepts and the skills to formulate, analyze, and solve real world problems. The

Learning environment will facilitate inquiry, use of technology and the exploration of real world phenomena. It will support continuous development of mathematical Skills and the appreciation of mathematics as a discipline. Our mathematics Program seeks to graduate students who will possess a sense of numbers, data Analysis, spatial relationships, symbolic representations, and the ability to Communicate mathematics with others.

Sample Placement Tests

Sample Replacement Test for Geometry
Sample Replacement Test for Algebra I
Sample Replacement Test for Algebra II

Standards

http://www.corestandards.org/Math

Math Department offers courses, all college preparatory, at all levels.

Math 6

Math 7

Pre-Algebra

Algebra 1 Foundations

Algebra 1 CP

Algebra 1 Honors

Geometry Foundations

Geometry CP

Geometry Honors

Algebra 2 Foundations

Algebra 2 CP

Algebra 2 Honors

College Algebra

SAT Math

Pre-Calculus

AP Calculus AB

AP Calculus BC

AP Statistics

Department Head 

Margin Alexander Bajrami

Philosophy

Music is all around us: radios, televisions, stereos, ipods, mp3 players, elevators, shopping malls and even on the phone. Music has more effect on our daily lives than many of us can realize.  Can you imagine watching a movie without a music?!  It has been said “it is the Arts that make man human”.  By learning about music, we are learning about just one of the ways our culture and society differ from and yet at the very same time are connected to others.  We believe that music is the only truly universal language.

Having said that, we also believe that MUSIC IS FOR EVERYONE!  Not just the very talented or the elite and select few.  Not everyone has the abilities or knowledge to be immediately placed in the group he/she wants, but with determination and practice we believe that any student can achieve their goals. At Pioneer Academy, one of our highest duties is to motivate and help all students to achieve their goals. That is the foundation and essence of our Music teaching and philosophy.

Music is a listening art, but we must do more than listen, we must also hear.  What makes music good or bad?  Is it exciting or boring?  How is pop music different from classical? Jazz different from concert band?  What do all the different styles of music have in common?  A good listener is an educated listener.  Students at Pioneer strive to become active listeners, not just by listening, but actually listening for something.

Music is a performing art. It is not static; it is always changing and evolving.  Someone has to make the music happen.  As a student at Pioneer Music Department, you have the privilege of making music for others to hear and enjoy.  At the same time, you will learn what makes music possible, to bring ideas and concepts from inside you and to communicate those ideas with others. You as an individual have much to contribute to every ensemble you are a part of! We prefer to teach music through performance.  The best possible way to learn is by doing!  Not by having someone else do it for you!  By being a member of Pioneer Music Department, you will also provide a benefit for the school and community by promoting school spirit, and providing music for a variety of functions.  All of our performing ensembles are a focus for school and community pride.  We have one of the few vehicles by which the community may observe what is taking place in our school.

Standards

The music department follows the National Standards and the NJ state standards. The state standards can be found here or the National Music Education Standards here.

» Department Head

Priscilla Lainez

» Department Staff

Aziz Cubuk, Yerbol Mukhamadiyev, Mustafa Dincturk, Serif Kaplan

» Department’s Philosophy

The goal of the science program at Pioneer Academy is to achieve scientific literacy and acquire science skills through hands on experience. A scientifically literate society is crucial to our increasingly complex and technological world.

Pioneer Academy students will be exposed to the rigors of scientific process skills (i.e. making observations, collection of data, formulation of hypotheses, predictions, experimental design, data interpretation, formulation of conclusions and theories) that provide a basic foundation for discovery in nature. All students, in all grades, deserve continuing and meaningful science instruction.

» Standards

http://www.nextgenscience.org/

» Standardized Tests used

SAT Subject Tests, AP Exams

Middle School Courses (pdf)

High School Courses (pdf)

Department Head:

Alex Benevenga

Department Staff:

Mr. Vatandas, Dr. Rahman

Department’s Philosophy

Our philosophy in Social Studies is an education that provides students the environment and tools to gain and apply historical knowledge and to hone their skills as indicated below.

Goals for our Students:

  • To develop skills for perceptive reading, critical thinking, summarizing, and intelligent articulation.
  • To develop the ability to use and conduct research in primary materials.
  • To develop an awareness and appreciation for other cultures.
  • To expose students to a wide variety of historical approaches.
  • To help students deal with the present and future by studying the past patterns and trends of human activity.
  • To analyze the ever-changing, global issues of our world.
  • To become aware of their roles as citizens in society and prepare to participate actively, competently, and productively.

Standards (provide the standards used or link where we can obtain them)

National Social Studies Standards; see link http://downloads.ncss.org/NCSSTeacherStandardsVol1-rev2004.pdf

Course List with a short description of each course and course pre-requisite if any

Ancient World History

9th or 10th grade standing

In this course we will be studying World History from Early Man through the Renaissance. Through the study of World History it is intended to give the student a broader view of the world around us and of meaning to our place in this global village. Some key topics covered in this course include on a more in-depth level than 6th grade: The Four Early Civilizations (Mesopotamia, Egypt, China, India), The Mesoamerican Civilizations, Ancient Greece, Ancient Rome, Early Africa, the Middle East, The Middle Ages, and The Renaissance.

Modern World History

This course will focus on World History starting from the 17th Century.  The focus of the course will be regional and linear.  We will have units that focus on Europe for a brief period of time, then switch to Asia for roughly the same period of time, then to Africa and the Americas.  The course will also focus heavily on cross cultural themes and interaction between groups of people and how world history is becoming increasingly closer as we enter the age of globalization.

United States History

11th or 12th grade standing

This course examines the major turning points in United States history beginning with the events leading up to the American Revolution, the origins of our constitution, reform movements, Manifest Destiny, the Civil War and Reconstruction, the impact of the frontier, the changing nature of business and government, World War I, the Great Depression, World War II, the growth of the United States as a world power, the Cold War and the struggle to achieve class, ethnic, racial, and gender equality. The course extends to the modern day. Contemporary world issues such as globalization, economic interdependence, and terrorism. World cultures will also factor into our analysis of international conflict and cooperation.

AP United States History

Pre-Requisites: “A” average in Social Studies and strong English writing skills. Teacher recommendation

This course is offered to selected students of proven academic ability in the field of Social Studies.  This is a college level course in United States History culminating with the Advanced Placement exam.  Students achieving a successful grade on this exam may apply for college credit.  This course will fulfill the United States History high school requirement.

Offered every school year

AP World History

Pre-Requisites: “A” average in Social Studies and strong English writing skills. Teacher recommendation

This course is taught at the college-level and culminates with the AP Exam. Students achieving a successful grade on the AP Exam may apply for college credit. The AP World History course is to develop greater understanding of the development of global processes and contacts, in interaction with different types of human societies. This understanding is advanced through a combination of factual knowledge and analytical skills. The course highlights the nature of changes in international frameworks and their causes and consequences, as well as comparisons among major societies. This course will satisfy the high school World History requirement.

Offered every other year

AP European History

Pre-Requisites: “A” average in Social Studies and strong English writing skills. Teacher recommendation

AP European History is a rigorous academic course that furnishes a basic narrative of events and movements in European History from 1450 to the present.  It prepares students for the demands of a college education by providing experience in college level reading, writing and responsibility for learning. This course is taught at the college-level and culminates with the AP Exam. Students achieving a successful grade on the AP Exam may apply for college credit.

Offered every other year

AP Comparative Government and Politics (1/2 year)

AP United States Government and Politics  (1/2 year)

Pre-Requisites: “A” average in Social Studies and strong English writing skills. Teacher recommendation

This college-level Advanced Placement provides high achieving students with a learning experience equivalent to a college course in United States Government and Politics and a college course in Comparative Government and Politics. The course studies government and politics in the United States as well as examining the world’s diverse political structures and practices. This course culminates in the student taking the AP Exam in United States Government and Politics and/or the AP Exam in Comparative Government and Politics. A separate grade is reported for each test.

Offered every other year

TURKISH EDUCATION IN WAYNE SPANISH EDUCATION IN WAYNE

Each student entering the grade level listed is required to read the book indicated. If you have any questions regarding the summer reading, please contact your English Teacher.

Summer-Reading_pioneer

Required Summer Reading Books by Grade

Students are to read the novel listed for the grade they are entering in September. For example, if a student will be entering 9th grade in September, he is to read Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka and complete the assignment listed below.

9th Grade: The Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemingway
10th Grade: Crime and Punishment
11th Grade: A Tale of Two Cities by Chales Dickens
12th Grade: Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad

Required Project for High School (10% of first quarter grade) ( 1 part):

Create a quote journal for each chapter of the book. You must find a minimum of two quotes per chapter and explain the significance of each quote. Does it develop a character? Does it aid in character development? Is it a thematic quote? A minimum of three sentences is required per quote. If plagiarism is suspected, you will receive a 0 for the assignment.
Example: From The Tale of Two Cities Chapter 1:
“It was the best of times. It was the worst of times. It was the age of reason. It was the age of foolishness.”
This is an example of foreshadowing and paradox. This is the opening of the book but has great significance as the novel progresses. Dickens is also setting the tone for the novel and drawing on historical significance of the “times.”

Recommended Summer Reading Books by Grade

Incoming 9th grade Suggested Reading

Acceleration by Graham McNamee

Bless the Beasts and Children by Glendon Swarthout

The Boys of Summerby Roger Kahn

The Dark Light by Mette Newth

Eaters of the Dead by Michael Crichton

The Fire from Heaven; The Persian Boy; Funeral Games by Mary Renault

The Floating World by Cynthia Kadohata

Fried Green Tomatoes at the Whistle Stop Cafe by Fannie Flagg

Hoop Dreams: A True Story of Hardship and Triumph by Ben Joravsky

Longitude: The True Story of a Lone Genius Who Solved the Greatest Scientific Problem of His Time by Dava Sobel

Incoming 10th grade Suggested Reading

The Da Vinci Code by Dan Brown

Caramelo by Sandra Cisneros

Great Jones Street by Don DeLillo

Childhood and Other Neighborhoods by Stuart Dybek

The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down by Anne Fadiman

Everything Is Illuminated by Jonathan Safran Foer

Snow Falling on Cedars by David Guterson

Bang the Drum Slowly by Mark Harris

The Kite Runner by  Khaled Hosseini

The Bean Trees by Barbara Kingsolver

Purple Hibiscus by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

Snow in August by Pete Hamill

The Swallows of Kabul by Yasmina Khadra